Archives for

AutoCAD Course

2.10 The context menu

  The context menu is very common in any program. It appears by pointing to a certain object and pressing the right mouse button and is called "contextual" because the options it presents depend on both the object pointed to with the cursor, and the process or command that it is performing. Observe in the following video the difference between ...

2.9 Palettes

  Given the large number of tools that Autocad has, these can also be grouped in windows called Palettes. The Tool Palettes can be located anywhere in the interface, attached to one of its sides, or remain floating over the drawing area. To activate the tool palettes, we use the ...

2.8.3 Toolbars

  A heritage from previous versions of Autocad is the presence of a large collection of toolbars. Although they are falling into disuse due to the ribbon, you can activate them, place them somewhere in the interface and use them in your work session if that seems more convenient. To see…

2.7 The status bar

  The status bar contains a series of buttons whose utility we will be reviewing gradually, what is worth noting here is that its use is as simple as using the mouse cursor over any of its elements. Alternatively, we can activate or deactivate its buttons with the menu of the status bar.  

2.6 Dynamic Parameter Capture

  What was stated in the previous section regarding the command line window is fully valid in all versions of Autocad, including the one that is the object of study in this course. However, as of the 2006 version, a visual difference was incorporated that, in addition to being very attractive, is very ...

6565 Test Video

When we activate a simple editing command, such as "Copy", Autocad turns the cursor into a small box called "selection box", which we talked about already in chapter 2. Selecting objects with this cursor is as simple as pointing to the lines that form it and click. If we want to add an object to ...